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Results: 1 - 15 of 513
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all of the witnesses who have joined us today for this important study. My question is for Mr. Sandford.
Mr. Sandford, it's not a coincidence that I'm wearing my UN pin today on my lapel. I wear it almost every day. I'm happy to say that we're matching today. I'm a big fan of the sustainable development goals, and my question today is prefaced with something that I find very troubling.
Recently, Conservative MP Leslyn Lewis, Pierre Poilievre's shadow minister for infrastructure and communities, not only supported and sponsored an official House of Commons petition that calls on Canada to expeditiously withdraw from the UN, but it has also become clear that she had a hand in drafting that petition. In that petition, MP Leslyn Lewis cited the negative consequences that things like sustainable develop impose on Canada.
Now, I am loath to amplify any of those harmful conspiracy theories, but they are regularly shared and used by Conservatives, and I think it's really important to recognize how much vital work Canada and the UN do together. I've been fortunate enough to witness some of it in francophone western Africa, particularly on clean water.
Mr. Sandford, could you articulate for this committee and this study how essential the work is that Canada and the UN do together to ensure water security, safety, hygiene and sanitation for those less fortunate?
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Sandford. It does.
I would note that there is a great deal of misinformation and disinformation out there, and that anytime it's amplified it does more harm to the institutions that are doing all of the extraordinary work that organizations like the UN—
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Sandford. You can count on me to continue to be a proponent for and supportive of the United Nations and all of the global citizenry that comes along with that work.
I'd like to move on to agriculture and water usage if I could—perhaps, with Dr. Madramootoo—with respect to international development and how important it is that we ensure that global water security and food insecurity are not issues that persist. Particularly, because of climate change right now, we're seeing more frequent droughts, floods and extreme weather events, which are impacting people's food security, which just increases a lot of unrest around the world. We know that a lot of conflict is often spurred by water and food insecurity.
Can you speak to the importance of Canada's role globally in ensuring that we decrease that sense of insecurity?
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
If you would, could you point out the number one threat to that security?
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, I'd like to speak to that motion.
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have a point of order, Mr. Chair.
Is this a different motion from the previous motion where the Conservatives wasted time? Are they just putting it on notice a second time?
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Thanks to all of the witnesses today for coming.
I apologize for my funny appearance. I'm grateful for the technology that allows me to do this from home, as I recover from my little eye surgery today. I want to say don't worry to my friends on the committee. I'll be back in person on Thursday.
My question's going to be related to the “What We Heard” report, which was the document entitled, “Toward the Creation of a Canada Water Agency”. It's about public and stakeholder engagement.
I'm mostly preoccupied with freshwater protection and conservation from a human and animal health perspective, which obviously includes agriculture and food security. I also want to give a shout-out to farmers and agricultural workers across our country.
Participants highlighted in that “What We Heard” study the need for more baseline data at a watershed scale to support assessments of new development proposals. They also told us that more research, monitoring and modelling is needed to anticipate and track climate change and other threats to freshwater quality, quantity and the health and functioning of ecosystems. This is particularly around fresh water, including floods and drought prediction.
On other panels we've explored the fact that here in Ontario we have the benefit of conservation authorities, which is a unique model in Canada that might be replicated precisely to learn from best practices and reduce some redundancies. Would any of the panellists today like to comment on similar science-gathering groups or agencies, or even a specific conservation authority in your region that has done some particularly exceptional work as it relates to human and animal health in fresh water?
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you for that. Thank you for highlighting the very unique example of the Ottawa River that not only flows through different jurisdictions, but actually has a north shore in one province and a south shore in another.
Is there anybody from another province or territory who would like to comment on an agency or science-gathering group that has done good work outside Ontario?
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
I have a point of order, Mr. Chair. It's a question of relevance on talking about the carbon tax while we're studying fresh water. I also have a question—
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'm sincerely grateful to all the witnesses here today for providing expert opinions and information. It's not just opinions, certainly. This is data and evidence. I really appreciate you coming all this way or appearing virtually.
My first question is on the Canada water agency and it's for Mr. Brandes.
I read one of your articles in Policy Options regarding implementation. Granted, it was written quite a few years ago. I perked up a bit when you talked about how the water crisis is fundamentally a climate change issue and that the things we put into the air ultimately end up in water systems.
I read the section on data collection. I always reflect on how lucky we are in Ontario to have conservation authorities that gather data and do science locally across our entire province. I think it is a model that could be repeated across the other 12 jurisdictions in Canada, which don't have the same historical benefit. Obviously, hindsight is 20/20, but conservation authorities do good work. When I award funding in my riding to a group that's going to do great environmental science, 99% of the time it's to our great conservation authority.
Out in B.C. and across the country, are there other examples of ways we might be able to stand up—perhaps through the Canada water agency—organizations that could do similar science?
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thanks very much, Mr. Brandes.
You mentioned that there would be a list of other organizations. In addition to submitting that to the committee for this study's purpose, it would be great if you could also send your wish list on what the Canada water agency ought to do. I know you've been looking into this for a very long time. This committee works very well because we have great experts to rely on for that expertise, so please feel free to submit a wish list, in terms of the list of organizations that might be useful, in addition to the conservation authorities.
Do I have any more time, Mr. Chair?
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
That's all. Thanks very much, Mr. Brandes.
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair.
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
Mr. Chair, I would like to speak on that first, please, because I had my mic on before he did.
View Adam van Koeverden Profile
Lib. (ON)
You can't do that before he runs the motion.
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